TUK TUK GOES WEST

By Craig McIntyre,

Following the success of Tuk Tuk’s first restaurant in Edinburgh, the team appointed Four-by-Two to develop the concept for their sister restaurant in Glasgow. Situated on the bustling thoroughfare of Sauchiehall Street, Tuk Tuk Glasgow was to be a vibrant, energetic space that would stop people in their tracks.

The design reinforces the status of a design-led independent restaurant, taking authentic Indian street food culture to a new level with their innovative approach. With a vaulted ceiling stretching from front to rear of the long, narrow restaurant, the inspiration was drawn from traditional Indian Tuk Tuks, where owners brightly decorate the inside of the cabs to compete with competitors. A series of colourful structures and artworks were installed, subdividing the restaurant and providing fun, vibrant features wherever the customer looks.

A dynamic timber canopy sits at the front of the space, drawing views of the passer-by into the restaurant. Behind this, is a raft of 190 paint-dipped, terracotta lassi cups, suspended from the ceiling and forming a colourful light feature at high-level. Stretching the length of the main dining space, is a 14m long hand-painted mural by local artists Ciaran Globel and Conzo Throb.

Canal encounters

By Craig McIntyre,

In 2016, Four-by-Two was appointed by Scottish Canals to undertake a creative role in an ambitious project that would see a 4 mile stretch of canal reimagined. The project aim is to improve the amenity of the Forth and Clyde Canal corridor from The Falkirk Wheel to the Helix Park and the Kelpies.

Unlocking stories of the canal through interpretation and large-scale environmental public art was one of the main objectives of the project. Working with the Heritage Team at Scottish Canals, we identified significant sites along stretches of the canal where commercial business once thrived on an industrial scale.

We selected two areas of importance: Rosebank Distillery and Lock 3 at Bainsford where we would celebrate the rich heritage and integrity of a working canal.

The subject of our designs reflects the time-honoured skills that once helped shape life along the canal and exported to the world. Rosebank Distillery operated for more than 150 years producing one of Scotland’s finest Lowland whiskies. The Cor-Ten steel bottle sculpture stands an impressive 5m tall and celebrates Rosebank’s position on the canal, allowing raw materials and coal to be received and whisky to be dispatched.

Along the canal at Bainsford, Mr McAuley’s Vinegar Works stood close to Lock 5 in 1854. Fish and chips were not yet a staple of the Scottish diet, but vinegar was widely used as a flavouring and preservative. The Cor-Ten steel sculpture celebrates a typical earthenware vessel typical of the era. Commanding a prominent location, the sculpture aligns with the canal and offers a view along a 1 mile stretch of the canal.

Four by Two celebrate

By Craig McIntyre,

At Four-by-Two, we’ve always believed that really good design is a powerful business tool.

The Dune ‘Catwalk Concept’ recently won a 2017 DBA Design Effectiveness Silver Award in the Personal Goods category.

The Design Business Association is the UK’s most vocal champion of the role of effective design in the creation of business growth. The DBA was founded in 1986 to recognise, communicate and reward the integral role that design effectiveness plays in commercial success.

The brief was for a new retail concept to assert Dune at the forefront of ‘affordable-luxury’ footwear in the minds of its customers; and to meet specific criteria to drive growth in key product categories such as accessories and men’s shoes. And, thus, to drive the brand forward internationally.

The resulting Dune ‘Catwalk Concept’ changed the dynamic of the brand, and the most important way of communicating the value of design is by measuring its true effectiveness.

The DBA’s annual Design Effectiveness Awards is the only award scheme that uses commercial data as a key judging criteria.